Two and Two Makes Five

It never ceases to amaze me, how the human brain is capable of tricking us into thinking that we have assessed people and situations correctly and that the opinions we have formed are an accurate representation of reality.

We are also very good at coming to the conclusion that the best and most effective solutions, are to be found in another place or at a much higher price. Well, on one count I’ve been guilty of all of the above in the last couple of years.

My golf club, the Hirsel at Coldstream, appointed a young PGA professional a couple of years ago and within weeks, I had assessed him as someone who would not be remotely interested in helping an ageing, mid handicap golfer like me and in any event, what could a young ‘slip of a lad’, setting up 500 yards from my house, possibly tell me about my ‘out-to-in’ swing, that some of the best coaches in the country haven’t already told me.

How wrong could I have been? The young pro has a fantastic attitude to people of all ages and abilities and has clearly dedicated himself to the ‘art’ not ‘science’ of communicating the technical information, in a language that we can all understand.

Apart from his obvious teaching ability, he pulls out all the stops to give the best prices he possibly can for equipment, footwear and apparel, which adds to the trust and confidence he has earned at our club.

I’ve moved from driving 50 miles for a golf lesson to walking across the golf club car park. I now spend my golf equipment budget at the pro shop, rather than surfing the internet, in an attempt to save a pound or two.

In all walks of life, individuals and companies seem to form incorrect judgements on ability, competence and value, based on either the wrong criteria or what they have been indoctrinated to believe.

As with all things, shouldn’t we try to get the balance right, by seeking out the knowledge and experience we need, as close to home as possible? We could be pleasantly surprised.